Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2017 – Energy Market Analysis

A view of Saint John’s waterfront near sundown

New Brunswick

New Brunswick generated its electricity from a mix of sources, which was 29.9% renewable in 2016. Nuclear was the primary source of electricity, also accounting for 29.9% of generation, followed by hydro and coal, producing 20.6% and 20.7% of generation, respectively.

Generation Trends

Nuclear, hydro, coal, and natural gas all provide a significant portion of New Brunswick’s electricity. Nuclear was the largest source in 2016, accounting for 29.9% of the province’s total generation. The Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station is the only nuclear power station in Canada outside of Ontario. It was refurbished between 2009 and 2011.

Coal and natural gas power generation have remained stable, supplying 20.7% and 15.5% of total generation in 2016. Oil and diesel generation decreased significantly, from 34.7% to 3.9% since 2005, due to provincial emissions policies that helped New Brunswick meet its 2030 GHG emissions targets 15 years early.

Hydro was the main source of renewable energy in New Brunswick, accounting for 20.6% of generation in 2016. Most of the province’s wind power facilities were installed during the refurbishment of Point Lepreau. In 2016, wind accounted for 5.6% of generation. Biomass averaged 4.0% of generation between 2005 and 2016.

Capacity Changes in 2016

New Brunswick’s capacity was the same in 2016 as it was in 2015.

More Information

Canada’s Renewable Power Landscape 2016 – Energy Market Analysis provides additional information on renewable power in New Brunswick.

FIGURE 19 Electricity Generation by Source in New Brunswick

Figure 19
Description

This graph shows the composition of New Brunswick’s electricity generation between 2005 and 2016. Hydro fluctuated from 18.4% in 2005, to 33.0% in 2011, then decreased to 20.6% in 2016. Wind’s share increased from zero to 5.6%. Biomass remained stable at around 4.0%. Nuclear dropped to zero between 2009 and 2011 then increased to 29.9% in 2016. Coal fluctuated from 13.9% in 2005, to an average of 21.6% between 2009 and 2011, and was 20.7% in 2016. Natural gas increased from 9.4% in 2005 to 15.5% in 2016, while oil and diesel dropped from 34.7% to 3.9% over these years.

TABLE 8 Electric Capacity and Generation in New Brunswick

  Capacity in MW and % Generation in GW.h and %
  2005 2015 2016 2005 2015 2016
Oil and Diesel 1 593 1 593 1 593 7 300 1 223 591
37.6% 35.2% 35.2% 34.7% 8.9% 3.9%
Natural Gas 340 350 350 1 980 2 212 2 359
8.0% 7.7% 7.7% 9.4% 16.0% 15.5%
Coal 541 490 490 2 922 2 373 3 148
12.8% 10.8% 10.8% 13.9% 17.2% 20.7%
Nuclear 680 705 705 4 378 4 277 4 545
16.1% 15.6% 15.6% 20.8% 31.0% 29.9%
Biomass 127 127 127 610 361 548
3.0% 2.8% 2.8% 2.9% 2.6% 3.6%
Wind 0 294 294 0 737 856
0.0% 6.5% 6.5% 0.0% 5.3% 5.6%
Hydro 953 961 961 3 875 2 612 3 134
22.5% 21.3% 21.3% 18.4% 18.9% 20.6%
All renewable sources 1 080 1 382 1 382 4 485 3 710 4 538
25.5% 30.6% 30.6% 21.3% 26.9% 29.9%
All sources 4 235 4 520 4 520 21 064 13 796 15 181

Residential Bills and Greenhouse Gas Generation Intensity

New Brunswick’s largest city, Moncton, has a residential electricity bill of $125 for 1 000 kW.h close to the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. New Brunswick’s GHG generation intensity is relatively high, emitting 280 grams of GHGs per kW.h double the Canadian mean of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

FIGURE 20

FIGURE 20

Source and Description

Source:
Hydro-Québec, National Inventory Report

Description:
Two dials indicate the monthly residential electricity bill for 1 000 kW.h and the GHG generation intensity in grams of GHG per kW.h. New Brunswick’s largest city, Moncton, has a residential electricity bill of $125 for 1 000 kW.h close to the Canadian mean of $129 per 1 000 kW.h. New Brunswick’s GHG generation intensity is relatively high, emitting 280 grams of GHGs per kW.h double the Canadian average of 140 g GHG/kW.h.

 

 

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